If you want to lose weight, carbohydrates could be your worst enemy. A recent “Today” show highlights a perspective piece suggesting that losing weight involves more than cutting carbohydrates. Instead of worrying about balancing calories, it is about cutting carbohydrate intake. Dr. David Ludwig, a leading author, said “Today” that the body “fights back against calorie restriction.”

According to the show’s findings, people who limit calories are more likely to feel hungry. However, it also slows down metabolism.”So, there aren’t enough calories in the bloodstream. They’re too few.

He explained how insulin overproduction could lead to fat cells being programmed by the body to store too many calories. Ludwig, an endocrinologist, and professor of pediatrics and nutrition at Harvard Medical School argues for the “carbohydrate-insulin model” of obesity.

Healthline states insulin is a hormone created by the pancreas. This hormone controls the quantity of sugar, or glucose, in our bloodstream.
Ludwig recommends that how we think about weight reduction is wrong. Ludwig stated that, given the choice of bread & butter, Ludwig spent years focusing on getting rid of the butter.”But maybe it’s the bread that is the greater issue.”

DIABETES DRUGS CAN IMPACT SIGNIFICANT WEIGHT LOSS IN PEOPLE WITH OBESITY:
Weight gain is not caused by excessive calories. However, certain sugars in carbohydrates can cause our bodies to store extra energy, leading us to eat more.

Dr. Karl Nadolsky is an endocrinologist that specializes in metabolic and obesity.

“The whole of the world thinks obesity’s about energy balance,” stated Dr. Robert Lustig of the University of California San Francisco division of endocrinology. Lustig had previously termed a comparable model of excessive insulin leading to weight gain.

“Consequently, it’s calories up, calories down. Every calorie can be part of a balanced diet. It comes down to two behaviors: gluttony (or sloth). You are responsible for your weight. So, exercise and diet are essential.

Ludwig & co-authors have noted that the energy balance theory, which states that people take in more energy than they burn, describes why people gain weight. However, this is the missing “why.”

MedPage claims that Ludwig’s paper sparked controversy in the medical field, with researchers “defending and decrying” the piece.