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The Internet of Things concept was not new. We were actually envisioning a huge deployment of sensors connected to the internet. This would allow many companies to create new applications. We have reverted to an approach that mostly takes the internet out the IoT. This is because the business model and privacy/security issues were not easily validated.

The question arises that what substitute replaces the internet and the answer to this question is the concept of NOT (Network Of Things).
The Internet of Things concept was not new. We were actually envisioning a huge deployment of sensors connected to the internet. This would allow many companies to create new applications. We have reverted to an approach that mostly takes the internet out the IoT. This is because the business model and privacy/security issues were not easily validated.

Real IoT protocols combine standard and proprietary technologies. Most of them can operate at very short ranges on unlicensed wireless spectrum, with a maximum distance of a few hundred feet. The principle of discovery they use is the same as router networks, choosing the best route and discovering network topology. However, the implementation is quite different. The first is the short-range problem. IoT networks operate within a facility, while router networks can work globally.

Monitoring Need

There is a problem with wireless IoT networks. They don’t have a sniffer that can decode messages and detect signals. Network professionals cannot monitor the network to determine what’s going on. They must rely on the IoT hub’s view, meaning that if a sensor isn’t able reach the hub it will be out in the wild. You must first get the IoT hub and devices talking. If you do that, you will be able to see the route and strength of the signal.
This means that NoT planners must determine how far apart the devices can be placed. They should be particularly careful with battery-powered devices, as they cannot repeat signals to extend range. The ideal technique is to locate your hub in the centre of the network, then add range-extender/repeaters that just amplify the signals, beginning close to the hub and going outward, and then testing one as it’s added to ensure it’s truly linked before adding anything else new. After installing all of the repeaters, you may start adding the AC-powered devices near the repeaters and work your way outward. The battery-powered equipment is installed last, and if something doesn’t connect, more repeaters must be added until everything works.

Once the NoT elements are connected, they tend to settle down and function, as long as there is power. Each IoT device will exhibit its own power-fail behavior. Most sensors and switches will keep track of their current state and automatically recover from a failure. However, if you don’t like this, you can program your application to restore the state more gracefully. Because the hub is a small device, you might need to be extra careful about the power supply. It can be damaged by sudden power loss or surges. You can be sure that any hubs have a UPS.

Connected Devices Security

The security of the hubs is the next problem. Obviously, these small inexpensive plastic units aren’t supercomputers with endless resources for securing connections. The best IoT protocols will provide encrypted messaging, but that capacity is of limited utility if your hub is secure and devices must be actively connected to the network, making it impossible for third-party people. The protocols of IoT capabilities are very limited, making it difficult for an attacker to gain anything by compromising a device.

The true security issue arises at the point when your NoT network meets the rest of your network, i.e. the internet or your VPN. The hub is frequently used to connect these two very different worlds, and it isn’t much more powerful than the IoT devices. Because a hub can be as vast as a deck of cards, its own security protections upstream of the VPN, for example, are restricted. If someone gains access to the hub, they will be able to not only add their own devices to your NoT or delete yours, but they may also be able to slip upstream into your VPN.

It is important that you secure the hub-to/anything connection from all security perspectives. It is vital to secure the hub physically and also the connection between the hub’s network and other networks. Use Ethernet to connect to the hub, instead of Wi Fi. If you use Wi Fi, set up a separate network to your hub and any Wi Fi IoT devices. This will ensure that your enterprise is not compromised by an IoT attack.
The IoT Sensor Traffic Latency

The last issue is the fearful control loop. This is the pathway between the message intended to initiate a process step and the software logic that issued the commands. Many IoT applications can be very sensitive to delay. Imagine a large truck driving along to a gate. An RFID sensor will read the truck’s ID to send a request for information about where the vehicle is supposed to go. The driver will likely keep rolling slowly if the gate opens after the truck has been validated. Expect trucks to pass through several unopened gates if the control loop is lengthy, which means it has a lot latency. This is not a good outcome.

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